Andrew Scripts

Musings about Programming and Programmer Life-Skills

My Favorite Git Aliases, Functions, and Configs

You can find all of these aliases and functions (and then some!) on my Github here: https://github.com/Andrew565/dotfiles. Read on for detailed explanations of what they are and what they do, and be sure to also check out my preferred git workflow.

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My One-Way Git Workflow (or, How to Git Well)

There are a lot of git workflows out there. This is mine, based on working with Git for 10-something years now. It makes use of git rebase, so turn away now if you’re scared of rebasing (and then go read this and realize it’s just another tool). BONUS: be sure to check out my handy git helpers too!

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Making a Card Game in JS, pt. 2 – The Surprises

This is the second part of my series on creating a card game based on Dungeon Solitaire by Matthew Lowes. You can find the first part of this series here.

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Making a Card Game in JavaScript, pt 1 – The Setup

I haven’t written here in a long, long time, but I think now’s as good a time as any to get back into it. I recently found myself looking for a new job; as part of the search, I created a portfolio website for myself here. But I found myself with a problem: I had no non-proprietary code I could show off on my portfolio. I decided I would make a game, one which I’ve been wanting to make for some time.

I’ve been playing this solitaire card game for awhile now called Dungeon Solitaire by Matthew Lowes. The game simulates deep diving into a tomb searching for the treasures buried there along with four kings. What I’ve always loved about this patience-style game is that it has simple-to-learn rules, uses a standard deck of cards so it can be played anywhere, and yet brings a rich story element to what would otherwise be ‘just another solitaire game’.

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If You Commit to Nothing, You’ll Be Distracted by Everything: Lessons from the “Marathon Monks”

If You Commit to Nothing, You’ll Be Distracted by Everything: Lessons from the “Marathon Monks”

Here’s the biggest thing I took away from this article:

If something is important to you, complete it. If not, kill it.

As James Clear, the author, comments, we often have many half-finished projects sitting in the backlog of our minds. Too much “soul clutter” can lead to exhaustion. If you can complete them now, do so. If you can’t, but you also can’t bring yourself to kill them, write out somewhere all of those ideas and half-planned or half-finished things that you really do want to do, and get them out of your head. Take a deep breath, and practice single-tasking. You can’t be 100% focused on something if you’ve got more than one ‘something’ in your head. 😉

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling

Such great stuff. My favorite is #14 – Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

I’ve been working on a few novels for years, and these 22 rules challenge so much of my work. The novel I have gotten the farthest on (in terms of getting it close to completion) is severely struggling with rule 14 here. My answer so far as to why I must tell THIS story? “Because, it sounds like a fun story!”

Is that enough?

1:1 criticism ratio

1:1 criticism ratio

“Think before you speak” meets “always be humble”. I’m not a huge fan of bashing, whether towards yourself or others, but there’s definitely something to remembering that everyone’s human, and we all make mistakes, and we – ourselves – make just as many or more mistakes than the next guy.

Keep this in mind any time you have a criticism. Is it really a big deal? Is it really a mistake that needs pointing out? If so, is it really necessary to berate the other person? Or is there a gentler way of saying, “Hey, don’t know if you noticed this…”?

When I worked for Pizza Hut, the first place that made me a manager (shift manager, but management all the same), one of the first things they trained me on was how to humanely deal with issues. Remember that not all mistakes are intentional, and that most people *want* to know how to do things correctly.

An Alternative to To-Do Lists for Getting Tasks Done | World of Psychology

An Alternative to To-Do Lists for Getting Tasks Done | World of Psychology.

Instead of thinking about what you should do or even what you need to do, think about what you could do.

Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh asks these interview questions to get people off their script

Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh asks these interview questions to get people off their script

Whether or not you’re looking to hire soon, or interview for a job, there are some very deep, thought-provoking questions here that everyone should ask themselves.

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling

Same great principles here, useful for general business thinking too.

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